The Chinese Revolution in Historical Perspective

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - 316 頁


This fully updated second edition provides a succinct and self-contained history of China. The text emphasizes the relationship between China's modern era and its past, employing a unique approach that presents the story in terms of traditional Chinese historical theories. When the West enters the scene in modern times, Schrecker fits its impact into the Chinese story, rather than the reverse, as is commonly done. This study demonstrates that traditional China was not homogeneous or changeless, thus offering a much-needed corrective to common stereotypes about other cultures that is essential for both classroom use and for the general reader.

The Chinese Revolution in Historical Perspective, available here in a fully updated second edition, provides a succinct and self-contained history of China. The text emphasizes the relationship between China's modern era and its past, employing a unique approach that presents the story in terms of traditional Chinese historical theories. When the West enters the scene in modern times, Schrecker fits its impact into the Chinese story, rather than the reverse, as is commonly done. This study demonstrates that traditional China was not homogeneous or changeless, thus offering a much-needed corrective to common stereotypes about other cultures that is essential for both classroom use and for the general reader.

Schrecker's approach permits a full appreciation of the connections between the contemporary scene and the Chinese past--an appreciation that is increasingly important as China moves away from typical Communist practices and returns to more traditional Chinese patterns--for example, recreating a lively entrepreneurial economy of the sort that characterized China for a thousand years. This edition brings China's story up to the present. An additional preface and map are included, along with an updated bibliography and supplemental notes. A new appendix details the traditional understanding of the key Chinese historiographical terms used in the book.

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內容

ANCIENT CHINA AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHINESE THOUGHT
3
JUNXIAN CHINA
33
FOREIGNERS AND THE WEST
75
THE REVOLUTION
105
REBELLION AND WESTERN PRESSURES
107
THE FALL OF THE QING
141
DISUNITY THE NATIONALISTS AND THE COMMUNIST VICTORY
177
THE PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF CHINA
211
THE TRADITIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONCEPTS FENGJIAN AND JUNXIAN
259
GUIDE TO PRONUNCIATION
277
GLOSSARY OF CHINESE TERMS
279
BIBLIOGRAPHY
283
INDEX
297
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第 203 頁 - In a very short time, in China's central, southern and northern provinces, several hundred million peasants will rise like a mighty storm, like a hurricane, a force so swift and violent that no power, however great, will be able to hold it back.
第 58 頁 - Heaven is my father and Earth is my mother, and even such a small creature as I finds an intimate place in their midst. Therefore that which fills the universe I regard as my body and that which directs the universe I consider as my nature. All people are my brothers and sisters, and all things are my companions.
第 20 頁 - The Master said, Govern the people by regulations, keep order among them by chastisements, and they will flee from you, and lose all self-respect. Govern them by moral force, keep order among them by ritual and they will keep their self-respect and come to you of their own accord.
第 25 頁 - The rules of propriety and of what is right are regarded as the threads by which they seek to maintain in its correctness the relation between ruler and minister ; in its generous regard that between father and son ; in its harmony that between elder brother and younger; and in a community of sentiment that between husband and wife ; and in accordance with them they...
第 25 頁 - A competent provision was secured for the aged till their death, employment for the ablebodied, and a means of up-bringing for the young. Kindness and compassion were shown to widows, orphans, childless men, and those who were disabled by disease, so that they all had the wherewithal for support. Men had their proper work and women had their homes. They hated to see the wealth of natural resources undeveloped, but also did not hoard wealth for their own use.
第 96 頁 - In vain did this arbitrary sway, laboring under its own inconveniences, desire to be fettered ; it armed itself with its chains, and has become still more terrible. China is, therefore, a despotic state, whose principle is fear. Perhaps in the earliest dynasties, when the empire had not so large an extent, the government might have deviated a little from this spirit ; but the case is otherwise at present.
第 188 頁 - I warmed the wine, carried it over, and set it on the threshold. He produced four coppers from his ragged coat pocket, and placed them in my hand.
第 144 頁 - ... and protect them unless we have the right weapons. They are daily producing their weapons to strive with us for supremacy and victory, pitting their superior techniques against our inadequacies, to wrangle with and to affront us. Then how can we get along for one day without weapons and techniques? The method of self-strengthening lies in learning what they can do, and in taking over what they rely upon. Moreover, their possession of guns, cannon, and steamships began only within the last hundred...
第 94 頁 - The responsibility for orderly management of the entire realm is wholly and completely committed to their charge and care. . . . The order and harmony that prevails among magistrates, both high and low, ... is also worthy of admiration. . . . Every third year ... a rigorous investigation is made concerning the magistrates of every province in the entire kingdom. . . . The purpose of this investigation is to determine who shall be retained in public office, how many are to be removed, and the number...
第 120 頁 - Let us ask, where is your conscience? I have heard that the smoking of opium is very strictly forbidden by your country; that is because the harm caused by opium is clearly understood. Since it is not permitted to do harm to your own country, then even less should you let it be passed on to the harm of other countries — how much less to China!

關於作者 (2004)

JOHN E. SCHRECKER is Professor of History and Chair of the East Asian Studies Program at Brandeis University. He is also a member of the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research at Harvard University. Among other works, he is the author of Imperialism and Chinese Nationalism, the co-author of Mrs. Chiang's Szechwan Cookbook, and numerous articles. In 1998, the first edition of The Chinese Revolution in Historical Perspective appeared in Chinese translation.

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