Catholicism and History: The Opening of the Vatican Archives

封面
Continual and sometimes heated interest is shown in the control by governments over documents in their possession, and in the time during which access to them is denied - and not only on the part of the historians to whom the documents are of prime concern. Professor Chadwick summarises the gradual establishment of the papal records down to the beginning of the nineteenth century, when they were carried off to Paris on the orders of Napolean. Their return (for the most part) to Rome and the subsequent history of the relationship between their guardians and would-be users provide a lively narrative of human as well as historical interest. The author shows how an argument developed within the Vatican itself between the statesmen who wished rigourously to restrict what was released to the public and the historians who wanted free access. This important study of how new attitudes and techniques of history affected the Church is based upon the author's Herbert Hensley Henson Lectures in Oxford 1976, and will interest documentalists and general readers as well as ecclesiastical and general historians.
 

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內容

Marino Marini
14
Theiner
31
The Minutes of the Council of Trent
46
The Opening of the Archives
72
The Borgia Pope
110
Epilogue
137
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關於作者 (1978)

William Owen Chadwick was born in London, England on May 20, 1916. He received a degree in history in 1938 and a degree in theology in 1939 from St. John's College in Cambridge. He attended Cuddeson, a theological college, to study for holy orders. The Church of England ordained him a deacon in 1940 and a priest in 1941. He was master of Selwyn College, Cambridge University, for almost 30 years, beginning in the mid-1950s and retiring in 1983. He was chancellor of the University of East Anglia from 1985 to 1994. In 1966, he was put at the head of a commission to redefine Parliament's role in church affairs. When put into effect, the recommendations of the Chadwick Report, retained the ties between the Church of England and the state but gave the church greater control over the appointment of bishops. It also ended Parliament's nominal control over changes in doctrine and ritual. He wrote numerous books during his lifetime including John Cassian: A Study in Primitive Monasticism, The Reformation, The Secularization of the European Mind in the Nineteenth Century, Victorian Miniature, The Victorian Church, The Christian Church in the Cold War, and A History of Christianity. He oversaw the publications of a 16-volume work entitled The Oxford History of the Christian Church. He also wrote three volumes himself: The Popes and European Revolution, A History of the Popes, 1830-1914, and The Early Reformation on the Continent. He died on July 17, 2015 at the age of 99.

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