Consequences of Consciousness: Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy

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Stanford University Press, 2007 - 238 頁
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Russian psychological prose has made a distinct contribution to world culture not only to literature, but also to practical psychology and even to neuropsychology. Consequences of Consciousness focuses primarily on Russian ideas of the self and subjectivity, and how these ideas find expression in the fiction of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy the most important founding authors of the Russian school of psychological realism. These writers explore both the limits and the autonomy of subjective consciousness, and their books are as relevant today as they have ever been. Through close analysis of many well-known texts, Orwin reveals that these three authors conversed with each other through their works. She emphasizes the role Western thought played in the development of their psychological prose and how it was transformed by a Russian context.

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Introduction I
1
The Origins of SelfConsciousness as a National
12
Moments in Tolstoys Fiction
57
Russian Psychological Prose
113
Conclusion
180
Notes
189
Selected Bibliography
217
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關於作者 (2007)

Donna Tussing Orwin is Professor of Russian Literature in the Department of Slavic Studies at the University of Toronto. She is the author of the prize-winning study Tolstoy's Art and Thought, 1847-1880 (1993), editor (with Robin Feuer Miller) of Kathryn Feuer's Tolstoy and the Genesis of War and Peace (1996), and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy (2002). She was editor of Tolstoy Studies Journal for eight years, and is now President of the Tolstoy Society.

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