The Cambridge History of China: Volume 10, Late Ch'ing 1800-1911, Part 1

封面
John K. Fairbank
Cambridge University Press, 1978年6月5日 - 730 頁
This is the first of two volumes in this major Cambridge history dealing with the decline of the Ch'ing empire. It opens with a survey of the Ch'ing empire in China and Inner Asia at its height, in about 1800. Contributors study the complex interplay of foreign invasion, domestic rebellion and Ch'ing decline and restoration. Special reference is made to the Peking administration, the Canton trade and the early treaty system, the Taiping, Nien and other rebellions, and the dynasty's survival in uneasy cooperation with the British, Russian, French, American and other invaders. Each chapter is written by a specialist from the international community of sinological scholars. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary; for readers with Chinese, proper names and terms are identified with their characters in the glossary, and full references to Chinese, Japanese and other works are given in the bibliographies. Numerous maps illustrate the text, and there are a bibliographical essays describing the source materials on which each author's account is based.

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用戶評語  - pbjwelch - LibraryThing

OK, this is obviously not a book you pick up as a casual read, but a book to be read by someone who has a deep interest in these two periods--the Sui (589-618) and the Tang (618-906). But for those with such an interest, this book is truly worth the 1000-page commitment. 閱讀評論全文

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用戶評語  - ccjolliffe - LibraryThing

It would take a deeper dome than mine to dare to review a Cambridge history. These sets are generally regarded as the apotheosis of historical scholarship. I'm just happy to have one! 閱讀評論全文

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