Public Opinion

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Dodo Press, 2009 - 268 頁
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Walter Lippmann (1889-1974) was an influential American writer, journalist, and political commentator. He was a media critic and a philosopher who tried to reconcile the tensions between liberty and democracy in a complex and modern world. In 1913 Lippmann, Herbert Croly, and Walter Weyl became the founding editors of The New Republic magazine. During World War I, Lippmann became an adviser to President Woodrow Wilson. It was Lippmann who first identified the tendency of journalists to generalize about other people based on fixed ideas. To his mind, democratic ideals had deteriorated, voters were largely ignorant about issues and policies, they lacked the competence to participate in public life and cared little for participating in the political process. In Public Opinion (1922), Lippmann noted that the stability the government achieved during the patronage era of the 1800s was threatened by modern realities. He wrote that a governing class must rise to face the new challenges. He saw the public as Plato did, a great beast or a bewildered herd - floundering in the chaos of local opinions.

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用戶評語  - Paul_S - LibraryThing

Insightful and timeless. I didn't realise until halfway through that this was written a century ago. Makes good points about the problems with democracy and limits to informed decision making. 閱讀評論全文

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