Autocratic Tradition and Chinese Politics

封面
Cambridge University Press, 1993 - 401 頁
This book examines the Chinese political tradition over the past two thousand years and argues that the enduring and most important feature of this tradition is autocracy. The author interprets the communist takeover of 1949 not as a revolution but as a continuation of the imperial tradition. The book shows how Mao Zedong revitalised this autocratic tradition along five lines: the use of ideology for political control; concentration of power in the hands of a few; state power over all aspects of life; law as a tool wielded by the ruler, who is himself above the law; and the subjection of the individual to the state. Using a statist approach, the book argues that in China political action of the state has been the single most important factor in determining socio-economic change.
 

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內容

The rise of the Chinese bureaucratic empire
15
PreQin political philosophy
28
Imperial ideology and authority
47
Traditional Chinese political institutions
70
Domination of the imperial state over society
87
The imperial legal order
104
The fall of the empire and the rise of the PRC
145
Ideology and authority under the CCP 170 10 Ideology and authority under the
172
The new legal order
243
I
265
II
287
The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution 19661976 308 16 The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution 19661976
308
PostMao politics
329
Conclusion
352
Bibliography
369
Index
391

The structure and process of the PRC political system
197
The capabilities of the partystate
220

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